Transceiver & Probe

A transceiver is one of the items on my shopping list for this season. Based on the riding that we did last season and the riding I hope we’ll be doing in Fernie, and the future for that matter, I’m gonna need one.

The question is should I buy one now or just rent one as and when I need to?

Renting is the cheaper option, for the short term at least, but there are clear advantages to owning your own. First, you’re in control, so you know things like whether or not the batteries are charged and what condition it’s in. Naturally you’d expect this if you hire a transceiver, but it’s a bonus non the less.

Secondly, you don’t need to go to a shop on the morning you decide to head off-piste. If it’s just dumped 40cm the last thing you want to be doing is adding time to your arrival at the top of the hill!

But perhaps most importantly is the fact that you’ll be using the same transceiver each time you go out. This means that you can get familiar with how it works so that in the unfortunate event of needing to use it for real, you won’t be fumbling with how to control it.

So despite the cost I am leaning towards getting one for myself…

  • Which brands should I look at?
  • Should I go for a pure analogue transceiver or a digital model?
  • Is it worth looking on eBay?
  • Should I get a probe too?

Simon passed me a link, which is a transceiver test that Facewest.co.uk did early this year. It’s a perfect review for someone like me who doesn’t really know much about what’s on offer. They sell avalanche safety gear on their site too.

About a probe… if I’m going to get a transceiver I may aswell get a probe too. From what I’ve seen, read and heard, they make finding a burried person much easier and quicker. You can use them for testing snow depth and stuff like that also.

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